Child Protective Separation

The key to stopping the cycle of narcissistic (borderline) abuse and neglect is for Child Protective Services to follow the same procedures for protecting and treating child psychological maltreatment as they do when they encounter physical and sexual abuse.

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Child abuse reports by state statutes and clinical indicators

The narcissistic/borderline environment constitutes severe Child psychological maltreatment . “Child psychological maltreatment is non-accidental verbal or symbolic acts by a child’s parent or caregiver that result, or have reasonable potential to result in significant psychological harm to the child” (p. 719, DSM-5 V995.51, 2013). 

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Reporting

Each State has a system to receive and respond to reports of possible child abuse and neglect. Professionals and concerned citizens can call statewide hotlines, local child protective services, or law enforcement agencies to share their concerns.

Anyone can report suspected child psychological abuse or neglect. States, any person who suspects child abuse or neglect is required to report.

 

 

managing Cases of Severe child psychological abuse

The key to stopping the cycle of narcissistic (borderline) abuse and neglect is for Child Protective Services to follow the same procedures for protecting and treating child psychological maltreatment as they do when they encounter physical and sexual abuse.

1. Provide a period of protective separation between the child and the abusive parent for approximately 4 months, depending on how quickly the children’s attachment resurfaces and the other clinical indicators disappear. 

2. Place the children full time with the targeted parent and engage them in therapy to repair the broken relationships.  Although the secure attachment between the targeted parent and his or her children will naturally bounce back within a couple of weeks, there are intense jump-start programs that can reconnect a parent-child attachment bond in a few days.

3.  Require the abuser to seek collateral therapy to gain insight into the causes and consequences of the prior abuse.  Since these parents are not likely to be able to make major changes in their personality traits, family, friends and professionals need to always be watchful for signs that the psychological abuse has reappeared; at which time, contact would be again be limited between the children and the abuser as necessary.